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Pleasant Grove vs WOS state final


Pleasant Grove vs WOS  

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    • (15-0) Pleasant Grove Hawks
    • (13-0) West Orange-Stark Mustangs

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Hawks already winners

By

 Bill Owney

 December 20, 2017

Four falls and half a summer ago, I had an epiphany.

After interviews with Josh Gibson, the new coach of a team that won five games in two the two years prior, plus watching practices and talking with players, I sat down and wrote the season preview for the 2014 Pleasant Grove Hawks.

Extra time and effort went into this because something had piqued my interest. Arriving home late, I explained to Beautiful Blonde Bride that I was dealing with something of consequence.

“It will take a few years,” I told her, “but Josh Gibson is going to win a state championship at Pleasant Grove.”

That I saw this coming does not mean I am smart; it just means I was paying attention. Prescience of this sort comes to us after we assume responsibility for managing processes and people. Enough years of burying oneself in the minutiae of things, and one begins to recognize patterns that lead to predictable results.

Over the years, I’ve tried to analyze and explain a wide array of topics, including a lot of football. Mix in nearly two decades in the classroom and my theories about what makes for highly functional teams and effective teacher-leaders had begun to synthesize

To be sure, the young coach’s energy, passion, and ambition were refreshing and delightful, but it was how he went about his business that virtually checked off all my boxes. If something – a business, a classroom, a sports team – is successful, it is because someone purposefully and consistently sets and enforces standards, and nurtures calculated risk-taking. In turn, a culture of mutual respect and accountability emerges.

So it is with Josh Gibson and the Pleasant Grove Hawks, and it is not just on the football field. Not only have the players bought in; so, too, have the coaches, who are given the respect and freedom to reach for the top. In almost every sport, a winning culture allows youngsters to grow, to achieve and, as a result, to win.

A question teachers hear in a job interview is, “What is your theory of education?” In the summer of 2014, I paraphrased that question and was immediately given a list of four core values that guide coach Gibson.

Relationships: At some point during his or her first semester on the job, a teacher hears, “They won’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” That’s where Gibson and his staff start work.

“We’re going to develop relationships with these kids where we love them and they look at us as father figures,” he said.

This is a time-intensive endeavor. I hear Gibson and his staff talk to their players about girlfriends, study habits, core moral beliefs, and the coaches listen to the kids. I studiously avoid eavesdropping private communications, but I see many a conversation between an animated youngster and a coach nodding his head and making eye contact.

Discipline: This isn’t about putting a bunch of rules on the wall, though Hawk athletics has some clear, non-negotiable ones. Rather, this is about creating a highly structured environment, which kids – even adolescents – crave. Every practice is planned. Every contingency has guidelines. “I think we turn over every stone,” Gibson said.

3. Belief: Not hope, belief. “Belief comes when the kids put in a ton of work. We teach them that the more work they put in, the better the return on their investment.”

Off-season conditioning, participating in non-curricular activities, such as 7-on-7 football in the summer, playing pick-up basketball and volleyball games all summer, playing select ball – all are de rigueur at Pleasant Grove if you want to get into the game.

Champions are not born; they reach their goals one step at a time. “We focus on the growth of the individual,” Gibson said. “That’s why we’re here in education, is to help kids grow. Every time they take a step forward, we celebrate that growth and encourage them to take the next. That’s why we keep getting better and better each week of the playoffs.”

These values reverberate throughout this special football team. Go read our stories on the various components, the linemen, the linebackers, the secondary, and the skill players, and you will hear the echoes of every one of these values.

“No one outworks us,” is an oft-repeated quote. “Our trust in each other helps us get through adversity,” is another. Frankly, I have never seen such an unselfish group of youngsters.

A season such as the one the 2017 Hawks are having is a gift to be treasured. In truth, no one can guarantee what will happen at Cowboy Stadium Friday afternoon, but I can assure you that when that bus crosses back into the city limits it will be filled with young men – future educators, doctors, lawyers, professionals of all stripes – who will be better husbands, fathers and citizens because of what they have learned the past four years.

In that sense, we all win.

Bill Owney

A veteran journalist and educator, Bill Owney is a 1980 graduate of the University of Florida. Writing awards include APME honors for investigative reporting, the Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Award for public service reporting and numerous awards for editorial, column and news writing. He served as publisher of the Atlanta Citizens Journal and Pittsburg Gazette when each paper won sweepstakes awards from the Texas Press and North and East Texas Press Associations. He spent 15 years as a public school teacher and is an adjunct professor of English at Texarkana College.

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Hawks already winners By  Bill Owney  December 20, 2017 Four falls and half a summer ago, I had an epiphany. After interviews with Josh Gibson, the new coach of a team that wo

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25 minutes ago, Gasilla said:

Reminds me of Navarro last year in the semifinal. 14-0, averaging 50 something a game... Good defense... Fans just could not believe they could be shut down... They were "different" than any other Wing T team... They could throw the ball at will... Fans predicting ridiculous scores... 41-7 at halftime... lol

It was actually 35-0 at halftime with 32 total yards. I was there at NRG in person. 

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On 12/19/2017 at 2:41 PM, Hawknation03 said:

Sat about 4 seats down from a Kennedale fan at the Star last Thursday he came out to watch the Grove VS Graham game. In the third qtr he got up and said he had seen enough and said yall are winning state to some grove fans in front of him. I told him "Not so fast" we still have to play wimberly or WOS. He responded "WOS will beat Wimberly yall will be playing WOS "I have seen WOS when they played us. They are not beating yall. Yall are to fast. even for WOS. Now I really didn't put a lot of stock in it. He then came over and shook hands with the Grove fans all around him saying "yall got state book it" 

Just a thought.

There's no question that PG has a great team. This one is going to be a great one to watch. Rooting for TK and PG. I hope they can get it done, but to be the man you have to beat the man as a wise man once said

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After watching hours of film,  I believe the hawks will be able to move the ball just fine.  The key will be containing WOS  QB and not allowing him to make plays with his legs.  It also looks like the hawks are vulnerable on "1" side of the secondary.  I'm still saying it will be close to the same results of the Melisa game. 

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9 hours ago, 1utexfan said:

Hawks already winners

By

 Bill Owney

 December 20, 2017

Four falls and half a summer ago, I had an epiphany.

After interviews with Josh Gibson, the new coach of a team that won five games in two the two years prior, plus watching practices and talking with players, I sat down and wrote the season preview for the 2014 Pleasant Grove Hawks.

Extra time and effort went into this because something had piqued my interest. Arriving home late, I explained to Beautiful Blonde Bride that I was dealing with something of consequence.

“It will take a few years,” I told her, “but Josh Gibson is going to win a state championship at Pleasant Grove.”

That I saw this coming does not mean I am smart; it just means I was paying attention. Prescience of this sort comes to us after we assume responsibility for managing processes and people. Enough years of burying oneself in the minutiae of things, and one begins to recognize patterns that lead to predictable results.

Over the years, I’ve tried to analyze and explain a wide array of topics, including a lot of football. Mix in nearly two decades in the classroom and my theories about what makes for highly functional teams and effective teacher-leaders had begun to synthesize

To be sure, the young coach’s energy, passion, and ambition were refreshing and delightful, but it was how he went about his business that virtually checked off all my boxes. If something – a business, a classroom, a sports team – is successful, it is because someone purposefully and consistently sets and enforces standards, and nurtures calculated risk-taking. In turn, a culture of mutual respect and accountability emerges.

So it is with Josh Gibson and the Pleasant Grove Hawks, and it is not just on the football field. Not only have the players bought in; so, too, have the coaches, who are given the respect and freedom to reach for the top. In almost every sport, a winning culture allows youngsters to grow, to achieve and, as a result, to win.

A question teachers hear in a job interview is, “What is your theory of education?” In the summer of 2014, I paraphrased that question and was immediately given a list of four core values that guide coach Gibson.

Relationships: At some point during his or her first semester on the job, a teacher hears, “They won’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” That’s where Gibson and his staff start work.

“We’re going to develop relationships with these kids where we love them and they look at us as father figures,” he said.

This is a time-intensive endeavor. I hear Gibson and his staff talk to their players about girlfriends, study habits, core moral beliefs, and the coaches listen to the kids. I studiously avoid eavesdropping private communications, but I see many a conversation between an animated youngster and a coach nodding his head and making eye contact.

Discipline: This isn’t about putting a bunch of rules on the wall, though Hawk athletics has some clear, non-negotiable ones. Rather, this is about creating a highly structured environment, which kids – even adolescents – crave. Every practice is planned. Every contingency has guidelines. “I think we turn over every stone,” Gibson said.

3. Belief: Not hope, belief. “Belief comes when the kids put in a ton of work. We teach them that the more work they put in, the better the return on their investment.”

Off-season conditioning, participating in non-curricular activities, such as 7-on-7 football in the summer, playing pick-up basketball and volleyball games all summer, playing select ball – all are de rigueur at Pleasant Grove if you want to get into the game.

Champions are not born; they reach their goals one step at a time. “We focus on the growth of the individual,” Gibson said. “That’s why we’re here in education, is to help kids grow. Every time they take a step forward, we celebrate that growth and encourage them to take the next. That’s why we keep getting better and better each week of the playoffs.”

These values reverberate throughout this special football team. Go read our stories on the various components, the linemen, the linebackers, the secondary, and the skill players, and you will hear the echoes of every one of these values.

“No one outworks us,” is an oft-repeated quote. “Our trust in each other helps us get through adversity,” is another. Frankly, I have never seen such an unselfish group of youngsters.

A season such as the one the 2017 Hawks are having is a gift to be treasured. In truth, no one can guarantee what will happen at Cowboy Stadium Friday afternoon, but I can assure you that when that bus crosses back into the city limits it will be filled with young men – future educators, doctors, lawyers, professionals of all stripes – who will be better husbands, fathers and citizens because of what they have learned the past four years.

In that sense, we all win.

Bill Owney

A veteran journalist and educator, Bill Owney is a 1980 graduate of the University of Florida. Writing awards include APME honors for investigative reporting, the Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Award for public service reporting and numerous awards for editorial, column and news writing. He served as publisher of the Atlanta Citizens Journal and Pittsburg Gazette when each paper won sweepstakes awards from the Texas Press and North and East Texas Press Associations. He spent 15 years as a public school teacher and is an adjunct professor of English at Texarkana College.

Man how I wish this could happen to Atlanta. I love how he connects with the players in and out of the field house and pushes them to there limits.

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1 hour ago, BigBoyRabbit03 said:

Man how I wish this could happen to Atlanta. I love how he connects with the players in and out of the field house and pushes them to there limits.

Y’all 3A now. Just out athlete everyone. Lol

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1 hour ago, Bull82 said:

After watching hours of film,  I believe the hawks will be able to move the ball just fine.  The key will be containing WOS  QB and not allowing him to make plays with his legs.  It also looks like the hawks are vulnerable on "1" side of the secondary.  I'm still saying it will be close to the same results of the Melisa game. 

Cam has improved he will lock down that side Yes he struggled a little but he has been incredible in the later part of the regular season and the playoffs.

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1 minute ago, Hawknation03 said:

Cam has improved he will lock down that side Yes he struggled a little but he has been incredible in the later part of the regular season and the playoffs.

Agree 100%. Cam has come into his own since the Gilmer game. That being said, you still better not throw at our 5’5” corner on the other side of the field!!!

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1 hour ago, Bull82 said:

After watching hours of film,  I believe the hawks will be able to move the ball just fine.  The key will be containing WOS  QB and not allowing him to make plays with his legs.  It also looks like the hawks are vulnerable on "1" side of the secondary.  I'm still saying it will be close to the same results of the Melisa game. 

You’re just now learning Hawks are vulnerable in the secondary?

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17 hours ago, 1utexfan said:

Hawks already winners

By

 Bill Owney

 December 20, 2017

Four falls and half a summer ago, I had an epiphany.

After interviews with Josh Gibson, the new coach of a team that won five games in two the two years prior, plus watching practices and talking with players, I sat down and wrote the season preview for the 2014 Pleasant Grove Hawks.

Extra time and effort went into this because something had piqued my interest. Arriving home late, I explained to Beautiful Blonde Bride that I was dealing with something of consequence.

“It will take a few years,” I told her, “but Josh Gibson is going to win a state championship at Pleasant Grove.”

That I saw this coming does not mean I am smart; it just means I was paying attention. Prescience of this sort comes to us after we assume responsibility for managing processes and people. Enough years of burying oneself in the minutiae of things, and one begins to recognize patterns that lead to predictable results.

Over the years, I’ve tried to analyze and explain a wide array of topics, including a lot of football. Mix in nearly two decades in the classroom and my theories about what makes for highly functional teams and effective teacher-leaders had begun to synthesize

To be sure, the young coach’s energy, passion, and ambition were refreshing and delightful, but it was how he went about his business that virtually checked off all my boxes. If something – a business, a classroom, a sports team – is successful, it is because someone purposefully and consistently sets and enforces standards, and nurtures calculated risk-taking. In turn, a culture of mutual respect and accountability emerges.

So it is with Josh Gibson and the Pleasant Grove Hawks, and it is not just on the football field. Not only have the players bought in; so, too, have the coaches, who are given the respect and freedom to reach for the top. In almost every sport, a winning culture allows youngsters to grow, to achieve and, as a result, to win.

A question teachers hear in a job interview is, “What is your theory of education?” In the summer of 2014, I paraphrased that question and was immediately given a list of four core values that guide coach Gibson.

Relationships: At some point during his or her first semester on the job, a teacher hears, “They won’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” That’s where Gibson and his staff start work.

“We’re going to develop relationships with these kids where we love them and they look at us as father figures,” he said.

This is a time-intensive endeavor. I hear Gibson and his staff talk to their players about girlfriends, study habits, core moral beliefs, and the coaches listen to the kids. I studiously avoid eavesdropping private communications, but I see many a conversation between an animated youngster and a coach nodding his head and making eye contact.

Discipline: This isn’t about putting a bunch of rules on the wall, though Hawk athletics has some clear, non-negotiable ones. Rather, this is about creating a highly structured environment, which kids – even adolescents – crave. Every practice is planned. Every contingency has guidelines. “I think we turn over every stone,” Gibson said.

3. Belief: Not hope, belief. “Belief comes when the kids put in a ton of work. We teach them that the more work they put in, the better the return on their investment.”

Off-season conditioning, participating in non-curricular activities, such as 7-on-7 football in the summer, playing pick-up basketball and volleyball games all summer, playing select ball – all are de rigueur at Pleasant Grove if you want to get into the game.

Champions are not born; they reach their goals one step at a time. “We focus on the growth of the individual,” Gibson said. “That’s why we’re here in education, is to help kids grow. Every time they take a step forward, we celebrate that growth and encourage them to take the next. That’s why we keep getting better and better each week of the playoffs.”

These values reverberate throughout this special football team. Go read our stories on the various components, the linemen, the linebackers, the secondary, and the skill players, and you will hear the echoes of every one of these values.

“No one outworks us,” is an oft-repeated quote. “Our trust in each other helps us get through adversity,” is another. Frankly, I have never seen such an unselfish group of youngsters.

A season such as the one the 2017 Hawks are having is a gift to be treasured. In truth, no one can guarantee what will happen at Cowboy Stadium Friday afternoon, but I can assure you that when that bus crosses back into the city limits it will be filled with young men – future educators, doctors, lawyers, professionals of all stripes – who will be better husbands, fathers and citizens because of what they have learned the past four years.

In that sense, we all win.

Bill Owney

A veteran journalist and educator, Bill Owney is a 1980 graduate of the University of Florida. Writing awards include APME honors for investigative reporting, the Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Award for public service reporting and numerous awards for editorial, column and news writing. He served as publisher of the Atlanta Citizens Journal and Pittsburg Gazette when each paper won sweepstakes awards from the Texas Press and North and East Texas Press Associations. He spent 15 years as a public school teacher and is an adjunct professor of English at Texarkana College.

Outstanding, PG is lucky to have such an great coach.

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I did some checking, admittedly very fast research. From what I saw and I may have missed one or two (i don't think I did), West Orange-Stark has been scored on 40 or more points only 6 times in its history dating back to 1977 and only one 50+ game in its history. I just don't believe that PG will put near that amount of points on the board. Hope everyone has safe travels.

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19 hours ago, Lion70 said:

Might not be kennedale is one dimensional but their rushing game is outstanding. I hope they can pull it off this game on paper should be just as good

If I had to bet I would lay money on Carthage, they are outstanding team.

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