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EYEAMCYCLOPS
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"EYE" know that this topic isn't a real big one but.........................

 

In the sport of powerlifting, why do you have to wear the suits?

To get actual strength, shouldn't people lift without them?

It is understandable that the suits do increase pounds to the lifts, but it is an inaccurate showing of strength.

 

Is there any meets for "natural" lifting? You can still use judges and rules, but no enhancement by using the lifting suits.

 

Just wanting to know thoughts and ideas

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The suits and belts and wraps keep their bodies safe. If there is an enhancement suit I would like to get one for my son... lol I agree that the squat suit does help with the spring up but please tell me how the suit can make him hold more weight on his shoulders and knees be able to get up more weight? I think it is a safety thing for the suits and not an enhancement. Just my opinion.

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I have coached Powerlifting for plenty of years (17), I have been a regional Director and State Director. With that said.... Yes the Squat Suits and Bench Suits add significant amount of weight to these kids maxes. But like said before, the reason the suits exist is for Injury Prevention. But like everything else they have "evolved" into much more than that.

 

The problem faced in changing the rules to no longer allow them is $$$$$. Inzer and Titan both Sponsor THSPA and THSWPA. Not to mention the amount of money these schools have spent on Suits. All of a sudden outlawing them would render $1000's of tax dollars useless.

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The reason it is not a UIL sport is because the upper echelon of THSPA don't want it to be a UIL sport. Right now it is under control of the coaches and if UIL comes in then they will run it how they see fit.

 

Almost every dime that THSPA and THSWPA makes is put back into the the Association and to benefit the kids.

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I've been coaching powerlifting for 6 years now. My rule is that if you lose weight you don't lift that week. Ex. If you weigh 225 at the beginning of the season, you better weigh 225 or more every week. And the suits, wraps, etc are for safety. I know there are powerlifting coaches out there that do questionable things but not all programs are like that. Let the kids compete and have fun.

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Just like everything else there are some bad apples in the barrel. But I can safely say that the coaches who encourage kids to lose weight in order to get in a lighter weight class are VERY few and far in between. Like every other sport the overwhelming majority of the coaches I have known in power lifting are in it for all the right reasons.

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The only time I will allow them to attempt to get into another classification is if we are a pound or less away. Even then we will not be doing any running before a meet. Most of those kids are so weak by the time they make the weight they are useless, not to mention unhealthy.

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I know when I walk away from a powerlifting meet I always marvel at the display of physical fitness and obvious healthy life choices of all involved. Especially the judges, they are definite beacons for powerlifting as a healthy avenue for true athletes.

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Your also not at 100% wearing the suits. Your at 110%. The wraps Im good with. Let em lift in athletic clothes. Do away with the dead lift. Overhaul the sport and make the strength version of a track meet. Have a hammer throw, sled pull and push. Lots of folks would get into that.

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To answer the original questions:

 

1. As was stated earlier, the suits and wraps were intended for safety. The knee and wrist wraps are obvious, but the bench shirt was intended to help support the bar/weight on the chest until the judges says "press" since the bar has to come to a complete rest before being pressed up. The singlet was thin material, like used in high school wrestling, but has evolved in to something completely different.

 

2. Yes there is are more powerlifting organizations than the THCSA/THSWPA and some of them do have unsupported or "raw" divisions that allow only a wrestling style singlet and a weight belt. USA Powerlifting is one of these groups and they also drug test 10% of all lifters at every invitational, state and national meet

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