Jump to content

UIL Medical Advisory Committee to Recommend


Sportsfanatic1
 Share

Recommended Posts

Although this is needed I don't know why they are making up their own guidelines. Myself and many other coaches that I know operate off of the MLB Pitch Smart guidelines. The only bad thing about this is small teams who may only have 1 pitcher and nobody else who can throw strikes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although this is needed I don't know why they are making up their own guidelines. Myself and many other coaches that I know operate off of the MLB Pitch Smart guidelines. The only bad thing about this is small teams who may only have 1 pitcher and nobody else who can throw strikes.

 

So develop a pitcher, that is why they call you coach. Teach mechanics, teach how to throw to a target, teach the kid to throw a 4 seam, 2 seam and change-up. It's amazing what a little work will do.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's amazing that you think I don't work. I didn't say my team. I have 1 pitcher and several throwers to put on the mound that we work with multiple times a week with bands, towel drills, wall drills and they throw bullpens on Wednesdays if they aren't used in relief on Tuesday, and the Friday starter throws a bullpen before the game on Tuesday. And depending on the number of pitches the Tuesday starter throws he will either throw a bullpen on Friday before the game or he and the catcher will throw a bullpen on Saturday. But I have seen some small schools that only had 1 pitcher and everyone else on the team had trouble throwing the ball to first. I started in small schools and you find a way to make it work but some times you have 12 kids on a team and when they get to high school only 6 may have played before, and only 1 or 2 have thrown from a mound. Anyway those coaches will find a way to make it work. Like I said this is needed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's amazing that you think I don't work. I didn't say my team. I have 1 pitcher and several throwers to put on the mound that we work with multiple times a week with bands, towel drills, wall drills and they throw bullpens on Wednesdays if they aren't used in relief on Tuesday, and the Friday starter throws a bullpen before the game on Tuesday. And depending on the number of pitches the Tuesday starter throws he will either throw a bullpen on Friday before the game or he and the catcher will throw a bullpen on Saturday. But I have seen some small schools that only had 1 pitcher and everyone else on the team had trouble throwing the ball to first. I started in small schools and you find a way to make it work but some times you have 12 kids on a team and when they get to high school only 6 may have played before, and only 1 or 2 have thrown from a mound. Anyway those coaches will find a way to make it work. Like I said this is needed.

 

I never said you didn't work and I definitely didn't mean this as a personal attack on you. Yes, small school coaches have it tough. I coach at a relatively small school myself and I have 12 pitchers out of 22 kids. For the first month of the season I get them every day and do a pitchers workout and teach mechanics, release points, do a throwing program, and do all the things you mentioned. We teach them to pitch. I've used 5 of the 12 in Varsity games and 2 in JV games. It can be done, regardless of the size of school or the size of the team or the size of the coaching staff. Research, preparation and coaching goes a long way in developing pitching.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I was a coach of a high school small town baseball team and I had to abide by pitch count rules I would work with younger kids in the hopes that I would have a pitcher by high school.

 

A coach that can't, doesn't or won't develop pitchers is not the parents or pitchers problem. This is why pitch count rules are needed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I was a coach of a high school small town baseball team and I had to abide by pitch count rules I would work with younger kids in the hopes that I would have a pitcher by high school.

 

A coach that can't, doesn't or won't develop pitchers is not the parents or pitchers problem. This is why pitch count rules are needed.

Very true, develop mechanics at a young age. Work with little league coaches to teach good form and proper mechanics. Teach 2 seam grips, 4 seam grips and a change up, all three pitches carry over to higher levels and are thrown with the same arm angle and release point. Pitching basics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very true, develop mechanics at a young age. Work with little league coaches to teach good form and proper mechanics. Teach 2 seam grips, 4 seam grips and a change up, all three pitches carry over to higher levels and are thrown with the same arm angle and release point. Pitching basics.

You speaking on 2/4 seam is a testament of your "lack" of pitching knowledge. I wanted to comment earlier when you were telling newball how easy it is to take a kid who has never played baseball and teach him to pitch. If a kid can't throw or catch by the time they reach high school, they will not contribute in a positive way to ANY varsity high school baseball team on ANY level.

 

And for the record, you're either a 2-seam or a 4-seam guy. Kids or coaches that throw both or teach to throw both cannot show you the difference in the 2. Yes, a 2 seam is supposed to tail/sink, but if you don't have the arm action or arm angle, what's the point of holding a 2-seam fastball if it's flat and straight? Just FYI...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You speaking on 2/4 seam is a testament of your "lack" of pitching knowledge. I wanted to comment earlier when you were telling newball how easy it is to take a kid who has never played baseball and teach him to pitch. If a kid can't throw or catch by the time they reach high school, they will not contribute in a positive way to ANY varsity high school baseball team on ANY level.

 

And for the record, you're either a 2-seam or a 4-seam guy. Kids or coaches that throw both or teach to throw both cannot show you the difference in the 2. Yes, a 2 seam is supposed to tail/sink, but if you don't have the arm action or arm angle, what's the point of holding a 2-seam fastball if it's flat and straight? Just FYI...

 

I guess we will agree to disagree on the 4 seam, 2 seam argument, you can throw both and many do and do it well. You teach the different grips to younger kids so that they become comfortable with both and when the velocity and tilt are there then the movement will happen. Never said anything about taking a kid that had never played baseball and make them a pitcher. You need to re-read the comments. I talked about taking baseball players and working with them to become effective pitchers. And I talked about working with young kids to become pitchers by teaching proper mechanics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

So develop a pitcher, that is why they call you coach. Teach mechanics, teach how to throw to a target, teach the kid to throw a 4 seam, 2 seam and change-up. It's amazing what a little work will do.

So if all it takes is coaching why are you not playing in the big show?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And your the Tony La Russa of u-tube pitching videos that could coach a whole team of small school players to pitch like Nolan Ryan.

 

No, not Nolan Ryan or anything close. But, I am pretty dang good. Took a team that had an ERA over 7 last year and with a focus on mechanics and hitting spots, as well as throwing a 4 seam and a 2 seam, we dropped the ERA under 4. Nothing spectacular, but we are consistent and we pound the zone. We are averaging 9 strikeouts a game and held a state ranked team who won a state championship recently to three hits. I did pitch a little at the college level, so I know a bit about what I am talking about. Learned from some very successful coaches at the Division I level.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

No, not Nolan Ryan or anything close. But, I am pretty dang good. Took a team that had an ERA over 7 last year and with a focus on mechanics and hitting spots, as well as throwing a 4 seam and a 2 seam, we dropped the ERA under 4. Nothing spectacular, but we are consistent and we pound the zone. We are averaging 9 strikeouts a game and held a state ranked team who won a state championship recently to three hits. I did pitch a little at the college level, so I know a bit about what I am talking about. Learned from some very successful coaches at the Division I level.[/quote

 

Who did you play for?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And for the record, holding down high school hitters isn't hard like it used to be anymore...

 

You are making my point for me, you just have to throw strikes and hit spots, and a little arm side run helps. Which can be achieved with solid coaching on pitching mechanics and fundamentals. If you have a kid that has a live arm then you can turn him into an effective pitcher. I am not some guru that thinks he knows everything, I just teach what I was taught. Northwestern State in 95 and 96.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a son who will soon play HS (I am a HS coach), and does play select spring/summer league baseball. This argument is ridiculous to me. Are we really pointing fingers at HS coaches and Arm abuse?? I will be impressed when someone takes on Perfect game showcases and big money select organizations who use kids to benefit the club. Nobody will do this, to much $. Problem is to many kids throwing year round, playing on multiple competitive teams, and not developing arm strength, it IS NOT the HS coach.

I guess all the concussions in FB are the Head Coaches fault, all broke noses in basketball are the basketball coaches fault?????

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...