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Chapel Hill Program


Stankylegg
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18 minutes ago, playactionpass39 said:

Sounds like the same problem Bowman had in Center. I've heard after the season he was not around the majority of the time. It is amazing to me that these coaches think they can do whatever they want with no understanding of the impact it has on the team. You expect the kids to show up and work every day and you expect your assistant coaches to show up and work every day, but as the Head Coach you can do whatever you want? Not the way to set the example and establish a winning TEAM culture.

Crazy to think that any head coach would do this. I just can't imagine them thinking this will help them win football games not being apart of the off-season. But on the other hand if they are out selling books guess its ok to be gone all the time.

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On 12/11/2018 at 8:03 AM, supermaroon said:

Crazy to think that any head coach would do this. I just can't imagine them thinking this will help them win football games not being apart of the off-season. But on the other hand if they are out selling books guess its ok to be gone all the time.

Crazy, but that’s what has happened the last 2 off seasons at CH.

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7 hours ago, supermaroon said:

Wow well that will definitely hurt a program not having a good off season going in direction the head coach wants for the program.

Agree. I watched a lot of great teams compete today.  Great programs.  Great kids.  Great coaches.  It does so much good for a community to have a successful football program. 

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51 minutes ago, Stankylegg said:

Agree. I watched a lot of great teams compete today.  Great programs.  Great kids.  Great coaches.  It does so much good for a community to have a successful football program. 

Heard anything out of CH? Crazy that a head coach wouldn’t be in and a part of the offseason workouts. I’ve been in two weight rooms this offseason so far,(job related) Kilgore and Jefferson. Both of them had a coach at every station. You would have thought it was a college program at both places. Loud music, intensity, it was awesome. Both head coaches right up in the middle of it, coaching, demonstrating, pushing the kids, heck I was ready to get out there and jump in and gets some reps in. Haha

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On 12/21/2018 at 7:38 PM, broncbuster11 said:

Heard anything out of CH? Crazy that a head coach wouldn’t be in and a part of the offseason workouts. I’ve been in two weight rooms this offseason so far,(job related) Kilgore and Jefferson. Both of them had a coach at every station. You would have thought it was a college program at both places. Loud music, intensity, it was awesome. Both head coaches right up in the middle of it, coaching, demonstrating, pushing the kids, heck I was ready to get out there and jump in and gets some reps in. Haha

 I’ve been told the decision to find a new AD has been made, but will be made official after the Christmas break.  Of course until it’s official it’s just scuttlebutt. 

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22 hours ago, Stankylegg said:

 I’ve been told the decision to find a new AD has been made, but will be made official after the Christmas break.  Of course until it’s official it’s just scuttlebutt. 

It's obvious that you care about the direction the program is headed ... I would be interested in your expectations for the next coach and what you think CH's rubric for success should be in the coming year ..

I like to watch the little things that kids do to determine their potential to operate with the mindset required to produce a hard-fought successful season. I always think about Shakespeare's Caesar line that describes Cassius as having “that lean and hungry look.” That's the look I want to see – are they hungry for success?

The next thing I ask is what's the community like. Many years ago, I coached at a large school that Gordon Wood coached at many seasons before. Legend has it that when Wood, who had less success there than anywhere he would over his storied career, left to take the Brownwood job, he made this statement - “This place will never win as long as the kids drive better cars to school than the staff.” History showed that he was pretty much right. It's hard to be hungry when you are “given” everything you want.  Success is something that HAS TO BE EARNED - there are no gimmees when life plays out on the Hundred Yard Stage.

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6 hours ago, DOB said:

It's obvious that you care about the direction the program is headed ... I would be interested in your expectations for the next coach and what you think CH's rubric for success should be in the coming year ... 

I like to watch the little things that kids do to determine their potential to operate with the mindset required to produce a hard-fought successful season. I always think about Shakespeare's Caesar line that describes Cassius as having “that lean and hungry look.” That's the look I want to see – are they hungry for success?

The next thing I ask is what's the community like. Many years ago, I coached at a large school that Gordon Wood coached at many seasons before. Legend has it that when Wood, who had less success there than anywhere he would over his storied career, left to take the Brownwood job, he made this statement - “This place will never win as long as the kids drive better cars to school than the staff.” History showed that he was pretty much right. It's hard to be hungry when you are “given” everything you want.  Success is something that HAS TO BE EARNED - there are no gimmees when life plays out on the Hundred Yard Stage.

While I agree with about 95% of that statement by Coach Wood, I’d venture to guess every kid that attends Highland Park drives a better vehicle than most coaches.

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I reckon there's an exception to most rules ... but I also reckon most HP coaches do a bit better than most coaches in the Piney Woods.  Personally, I preferred depending on and working with the summer hay-haulers than the country club goers .... I did have a few good hard-working kids in the latter set, but the best athlete I ever had come out of that group checked their gear in because practice was interfering with their flying lessons.

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24 minutes ago, DOB said:

I reckon there's an exception to most rules ... but I also reckon most HP coaches do a bit better than most coaches in the Piney Woods.  Personally, I preferred depending on and working with the summer hay-haulers than the country club goers .... I did have a few good hard-working kids in the latter set, but the best athlete I ever had come out of that group checked their gear in because practice was interfering with their flying lessons.

There was a college coach who once said he didn’t like recruiting kids who slept in silk sheets. I do t disagree with your preference of athlete.

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On 12/23/2018 at 3:29 PM, birddog7987 said:

There was a college coach who once said he didn’t like recruiting kids who slept in silk sheets. I do t disagree with your preference of athlete.

I always told 'em don't play the game if you don't love it; it's not for everybody ... it ain't about me; they're not quitting me - but they just may be quitting on themselves ... I always worry about quitting becoming a way of life.  But I'm sure he's doing fine thirty-plus years after the fact.  Karma says he's probably on the school board somewhere.  The Bear said this - "The first time you quit is hard.  The second time, it gets easier.  The third time, you don't even have to think about it."

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On 12/11/2018 at 8:03 AM, supermaroon said:

Crazy to think that any head coach would do this. I just can't imagine them thinking this will help them win football games not being apart of the off-season. But on the other hand if they are out selling books guess its ok to be gone all the time.

Obviously, at least to me, that It's a bit strange ... How Off-Season is conducted has always been one of my ways to evaluate just how long a coach expects to stay at the same site in the future. 

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9 hours ago, JugLine said:

What has changed?

That's a good question ... I would like to hear that, too ... if there are issues, I'm sure they are NOT the only community that has to deal with it - are they fixable?

And I think this question still needs an answer ... what are the immediate expectations for the new coach coming in?  At they realistic ... are they measurable?

"It's obvious that you care about the direction the program is headed ... I would be interested in your expectations for the next coach and what you think CH's rubric for success should be in the coming year ... "

Any coach that takes a Head Coaching job without a clearly established method of determination for success, including timeline, orchestrated by the sup and the board is probably asking for trouble.  All members involved in the process should state their expectations - and so the coach, before he takes the job, knows in advance what the measuring stick for success are - and that he believes that the goals set forth are reasonable enough ...

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On 12/23/2018 at 3:04 PM, DOB said:

I reckon there's an exception to most rules ... but I also reckon most HP coaches do a bit better than most coaches in the Piney Woods.  Personally, I preferred depending on and working with the summer hay-haulers than the country club goers .... I did have a few good hard-working kids in the latter set, but the best athlete I ever had come out of that group checked their gear in because practice was interfering with their flying lessons.

There was a college coach who once said he didn’t like recruiting kids who slept in silk sheets. I dont disagree with your preference of athlete.

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As far as the community goes, most folks that I talk to just feel like something isn’t clicking in the athletic program.  The classroom is strong, band, choir, etc are all competitive, so why not football.  

Expectations for the next coach:

Be present: Hooker missed all but two days of his first offseason, and when a senior captain on the team asked him why he hadn’t been working with them during the offseason he said. “You don’t worry about what I’m doing.”   IMO this may not be the reason CH was unsuccessful this year, but it definitely wasn’t a step in the right direction.

Invest: Good coaches invest in their kids.  You don’t have to hear it from the coach what they mean to their kids, the kids will speak to this.  If a coach is building young men, loving them, leading them, investing in them, they will sing his praises.

Grow the program:  In sports, wins are how you are measured.  If you don’t like it, don’t play or coach it. At CH the AD/head coach makes about 92k last I knew.  If you make this kind of money to coach a sport you’re expected to win. Rebuilding is fine, implementing is fine, but your second season shouldn’t be worse than first and playoffs should be the short term goal, with strong runs and titles the long term goal.  Let’s see participation increase as your program tenures.

Become a part of the community:  As much as the community needs to welcome the new coach with open arms, the coach needs to plant himself.  Church, little league, peewee, other sports, etc.  make it your goal to get to know the kids and their parents before they get to your program.

 

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In my experience the average player at CH just wants a male figure to love them, believe in them, tell them how great they can be, and show them how/push them to be great.  If you can figure out how to tap into this and get a program full of sold out kids, you will be successful.

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I would suggest that if you are planning on hiring an old school cigar chewing and sometimes vulgar vocabularied coach with an inclination towards speaking truth to you at all cost... That you can stomach it and that is what you truly want.. Or just hire another slick talking, pomade or dapper Dan user... Know ya role and ya kids.. Js 

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11 hours ago, Stankylegg said:

As far as the community goes, most folks that I talk to just feel like something isn’t clicking in the program.  Other sports are excelling, the classroom is strong, band, choir, etc are all competitive, so why not football.  

Expectations for the next coach:

Be present: Hooker missed all but two days of his first offseason, and when a senior captain on the team asked him why he hadn’t been working with them during the offseason he said. “You don’t worry about what I’m doing.”   He entered 2-a-days learning varsity players names, but he was hired in March.  IMO this may not be the reason CH was unsuccessful this year, but it definitely wasn’t a step in the right direction.

Invest: Good coaches invest in their kids.  You don’t have to hear it from the coach what they mean to their kids, the kids will speak to this.  If a coach is building young men, loving them, leading them, investing in them, they will sing his praises.

Grow the program:  In sports, wins are how you are measured.  If you don’t like it, don’t play or coach it. At CH the AD/head coach makes about 92k last I knew.  If you make this kind of money to coach a sport you’re expected to win. Rebuilding is fine, implementing is fine, but your second season shouldn’t be worse than first and playoffs should be the short term goal, with strong runs and titles the long term goal.  Let’s see participation increase as your program tenures.

Become a part of the community:  As much as the community needs to welcome the new coach with open arms, the coach needs to plant himself.  Church, little league, peewee, other sports, etc.  make it your goal to get to know the kids and their parents before they get to your program.

 

Thank you ... well conceived expectations and observations ... from a coaching perspective, there are things that have been apparently been done recently I certainly can't wrap my head around - but to try to explain them would call for a judgement, which I hate to put in place without knowing all the reasons.

My concern for inquiring about future expectations was based mainly on the fact that in the last twenty years, there have been only six winning seasons and more or less dominated by a feast or famine scenario – Sitton won 28 over two seasons, but won only 23 in the next five – how and why did that happen? ... that's not a negative statement, just one based on available data …

Castles had a very respectable .543 winning percentage during his four-year tenure at CH … the rest of his continuing 17-year career he has been .683. Why the difference?

Point here is - asking if a sudden and immediate transactional alignment in the Win column possible? probable? I don't know - that's for the community to answer ... and realistically.

Transitioning into the District of Doom near the mid-point of the current decade certainly had an impact after years of competing in districts with Brownsboro, Bullard, Athens, Rusk, and the like earlier in the century – but I suspect that is only part of the story. That's not being critical of the latter list, it's just that I suspect they would not have had a very good showing in that group either.

It is obvious that making the right choice to begin with is achieving critical mass – and I don't think you can do that based on a resume and just one committee interview. The point here is that this trend of winning percentage may well effect what coach or coaches in the future will be interested applying for a job to try to build a stable program in a community with expectations that demand immediate, lofty, and substantial concrete results. What I'm interested in seeing the first year is putting kids on the field that compete – every play, against any opponent, in any weather or venue – that's something that can be built on. I want to see kids who have been coached – who have been put in the position and taught to make the right move at the right time to do their job. Kids that will respond to challenges – and respond with class. Things you may not see immediately in the win-loss column – but you can see it when you look directly into their eyes - those are the intangibles.

To have an impact on turning a program into a consistent winner, sometimes you have to build the intangibles first – if you do, the tangibles will usually follow. So what are the intangibles – they are most of those things that you mention: being a part of the community (a must in the old days, amazed at how many don't today), being a good role model, having a vested interest in the kids' personal well-being and development, and motivate their spirit to achieve through a solid work ethic. And you, the coach, have to be SINCERE – you don't do these things in order to win – you do these things to be successful – you do these things because they are the right things to do in kids lives. You can fool adults fairly easily – but you can't fool the kids – they always seem to know if you're being REAL. I have always observed that life is about timing and fit - together.

Thanks again for your response … and as for mine, it doesn't make it all correct – it just makes it mine … whatever happens, good luck in the future – the kids deserve the best effort in order to give the best effort.

 

 

 

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