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Autism and Trying New Foods


Stoney
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Girlfriends daughter has autism. She is very particular on what she eats. Over time that’s evolved down to milk, grapes, French fries, strawberries and Coca Cola. Does anyone have any advice who may be going through or have gone through similar issues? To try and help try new foods? Texture is very huge to her.

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I won't eat any food that smells bad after it's cooked.  I actually hate most traditional New Years Day fare from ham hocks and  collard greens, corn bread, black eyed peas, boiled cabbage, poke sallet, but I do like Brussel sprouts for some odd reason.  I wouldn't know how to attempt to get someone with autism to try new foods, because they are into a routine and don't like their routine changed.  You might have your girlfriend ask her daughters physician on how to introduce knew foods to her.  

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18 hours ago, Stoney said:

Girlfriends daughter has autism. She is very particular on what she eats. Over time that’s evolved down to milk, grapes, French fries, strawberries and Coca Cola. Does anyone have any advice who may be going through or have gone through similar issues? To try and help try new foods? Texture is very huge to her.

DM me.

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21 hours ago, Stoney said:

Girlfriends daughter has autism. She is very particular on what she eats. Over time that’s evolved down to milk, grapes, French fries, strawberries and Coca Cola. Does anyone have any advice who may be going through or have gone through similar issues? To try and help try new foods? Texture is very huge to her.

If she's a wee little girl, just roll with it. Even kids not on the spectrum are often finicky about what they eat. Don't let it become a "thing" because it can veer into oppositional-defiant behaviors. Just continue to offer her something new, and when she says no just shrug and move on. 

But if she's a bit older, start by finding food that are similar to what she does like. If she likes fries, maybe try some "home fries" and see how she responds. If she likes strawberries, maybe try some raspberries. Expand upon her current palate incrementally. 

Texture is a major issue for kids on the spectrum, not just in food but in everything from clothing to sound and smells. To imagine what it's like to be autistic, pretend that every one of your senses is on steroids and almost everything you experience is often somewhat exaggerated. That's normal for them. 

 

Source: autistic man, married to autistic woman, and father of five autistic children. 

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2 hours ago, LOL said:

If she's a wee little girl, just roll with it. Even kids not on the spectrum are often finicky about what they eat. Don't let it become a "thing" because it can veer into oppositional-defiant behaviors. Just continue to offer her something new, and when she says no just shrug and move on. 

But if she's a bit older, start by finding food that are similar to what she does like. If she likes fries, maybe try some "home fries" and see how she responds. If she likes strawberries, maybe try some raspberries. Expand upon her current palate incrementally. 

Texture is a major issue for kids on the spectrum, not just in food but in everything from clothing to sound and smells. To imagine what it's like to be autistic, pretend that every one of your senses is on steroids and almost everything you experience is often somewhat exaggerated. That's normal for them. 

 

Source: autistic man, married to autistic woman, and father of five autistic children. 

She just turned 9. The girl can put away a gallon of milk a day. If she’s hungry she can put away a big bag of cool ranch Doritos. Same with a big carton of strawberries. I had no idea about textures. This girl loves Peppa Pig. I found some little dolls. They happened to be kind of squishy and sticky. She was not having it. It’s been a learning experience. Patience has definitely been the key. If she wants to watch a certain show on her tablet and you can’t quite understand which one it can lead to a meltdown. Staying calm seems to help a lot more than when sister gets upset with her.

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2 hours ago, RETIREDFAN1 said:

Or....just let her eat what she likes.....I don't try new food and I'm perfectly happy with what I eat........

She has a very, very conservative diet. Like you and Kirt had a kid who married Reagan and the constitution.

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1 hour ago, Stoney said:

Patience has definitely been the key. If she wants to watch a certain show on her tablet and you can’t quite understand which one it can lead to a meltdown. Staying calm seems to help a lot more than when sister gets upset with her.

This is key. You absolutely can NOT take her outward emotional "stimming" as defiance. It's NOT that. Not at all. This ain't the sort of thing that can be "fixed" with Pappy's ol' razor strap. Understand that this is a neurological condition. This is part of how she processes the world through her senses. You can't "discipline" her into being "normal." 

You've got to remain calm and, when possible, try to tag-team if/when situations start to escalate. The victories are always going to be incremental. 

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