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Jamie Farr is a retired actor most famous for portraying character Max Klinger in the CBS megahit series M*A*S*H. He first broke into show business nearly 70 years ago. He is 89 years old and born in Toledo, Ohio.

Farr was born as Jameel Joseph Farah. His father was born in what is now Lebanon and his mother was born in Iowa. He started acting as a child after idolizing Bob Hope and Red Skelton on the radio. He left Ohio for California in the early 50s and trained at the famed Pasadena Playhouse. He appeared in movies Blackboard Jungle and No Time for Sergeants and on The Red Skelton Show under his birthname in the 50s. He served in the United States Army in the late 50s. Part of his duties included being an assistant to Skelton who entertained the troops and they would form a life-long friendship. 

Upon resuming his acting career, Farr changed his name. In the 60s, he appeared in many famous shows such as The Dick Van Dyke Show, The Danny Kay Show, Hazel, My Favorite Martian, The Lucy Show, I Dream of Jeannie, F Troop, The Andy Griffith Show, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Get Smart, The Flying Nun, and Family Affair. 

Farr's character Corporal Maxwell Q. Klinger didn't appear in the original MASH movie in 1970. The M*A*S*H series started as a raw sitcom in 1972 and his character cross-dressed as a woman in a veiled attempt at a psychiatric discharge from the Army. The series became more serious as time went on as did Farr's character. When Gary Burghoff left the series in the first part of season eight, Farr's character took over as company clerk for Burghoff's character Radar O'Reilly. Like his real-life actor, Klinger hailed from Toledo. The character was eventually promoted to Sergeant. When the series ended in season 11, after years of trying to get out of Korea, the character ended up staying after falling in love with a local woman. The ensemble  M*A*S*H cast featured only four primary actors who appeared in all 11 seasons: Alan Alda, Loretta Swit, Bill Christopher, and Farr. All but Christopher are still living. Kellye Nakahara also appeared in all seasons as Nurse Kellye. She died in 2020. 

While appearing on M*A*S*H, Farr also appeared on shows such as Emergency!, Barnaby Jones, The Fall Guy, and The Love Boat. He appeared on the celebrity athletic competition show Battle of the Network Stars in the late 70s. He and his wife frequently appeared on the celebrity couples game show Tattletales. He appeared in other game shows such as the $100,00 Pyramid and Super Password. He was a celebrity judge on the comical talent show The Gong Show. 

After M*A*S*H, Farr reprised his role as Klinger in the appropriately titled series AfterMASH. The series lasted only two seasons. He has appeared sparingly on television since in shows like Murder, She Wrote, Diagnosis: Murder, That '70s Show, Family Guy, and The Cool Kids. He has appeared in film during his career but infrequently. He has appeared in movies such as The Cannonball Run (and its sequel) and Scrooged. 

Farr has maintained close ties to his hometown of Toledo. A park there bears his name. For years, he lent his name to an LPGA golf tournament in the area before corporate naming took over. It benefited, among others, the Boys and Girls Club of America. 

Farr has two children with Joy-Ann Richards (pictured). They have been married for 61 years. Their Ventura County, California home narrowly survived the Woolsey wildfire in 2018.

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REMEMBERING René Auberjonois (1 June 1940 – 8 December 2019; age 79) was the actor best known for portraying Chief of Security Odo on DS9. He also directed many episodes of the series. Prior to assuming the role of Odo, he appeared as Colonel West in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country

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On 5/30/2024 at 10:31 PM, RETIREDFAN1 said:

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Here's another.  I'm 6 years older than Redd Foxx was when he began "Sanford and Son".  When I was a kid I thought he was in his late 60's or early 70's, but he was only 49 years old when that show came out.  I just watched 30 seconds of the 1st episode, because I was 3 when that show first came on and even now he still looks like he was that age.  

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In MEMORY of RENE AUBERJONOIS on his BIRTHDAY - June 1, 1940 - December 8, 2019)
Career years:    1962 - his death
Born René Marie Murat Auberjonois, American actor and director. He was best known for playing Odo on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993–1999) and Clayton Endicott III on Benson (1979-1986).

He first achieved fame as a stage actor, winning the Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical in 1970 for his portrayal of Sebastian Baye opposite Katharine Hepburn in the André Previn-Alan Jay Lerner musical Coco. He went on to earn three more Tony nominations for performances in Neil Simon's The Good Doctor (1973), Roger Miller's Big River (1985), and Cy Coleman's City of Angels (1989); he won a Drama Desk Award for Big River.

A screen actor with more than 200 credits, Auberjonois was most famous for portraying characters in the main casts of several long-running television series, including Clayton Endicott III on Benson (1980–1986), for which he was an Emmy Award nominee; and Paul Lewiston on Boston Legal (2004–2008). In films, Auberjonois appeared in several Robert Altman productions, notably Father John Mulcahy in the film version of M*A*S*H (1970); the expedition scientist Roy Bagley in King Kong (1976); Chef Louis in The Little Mermaid (1989), in which he sang "Les Poissons"; and Reverend Oliver in The Patriot (2000). In the American animated musical comedy film Cats Don't Dance (1997), Auberjonois voiced Flanagan.

Auberjonois also performed as a voice actor in several video games, animated series and other productions.

Early life -
Auberjonois was born in Manhattan, New York City. His father, Swiss-born Fernand Auberjonois, was a Cold War-era foreign correspondent and Pulitzer Prize-nominated writer. Auberjonois' mother, Laure Louise Napoléone Eugénie Caroline Murat, was a great-great-granddaughter of Joachim Murat (one of Napoleon's marshals and King of Naples during the First French Empire), and his wife—Napoleon's youngest sister—Caroline Bonaparte. Auberjonois had a sister and a brother, and two half-sisters from his mother's first marriage. Auberjonois wrote that his French family name, an uncommon one in the United States, means "armorer."

Auberjonois' grandfather, also René Auberjonois, was a Swiss post-Impressionist painter. His maternal grandmother, Hélène Macdonald Stallo, was an American from Cincinnati, Ohio; his maternal grandfather's mother was a Russian noblewoman, Eudoxia Michailovna Somova, and his maternal grandfather's paternal grandmother, Caroline Georgina Fraser, who was the wife of Prince Napoleon Lucien Charles Murat, was a Scottish-American from Charleston, South Carolina.

Auberjonois' family moved to Paris after World War II. After a few years in France, the family moved back to the United States and joined the South Mountain Road artists' colony in Rockland County, New York, whose residents included Burgess Meredith, John Houseman, and Lotte Lenya.

The Auberjonois family also lived for a time in London, where Auberjonois completed high school while studying theatre. To complete his education, he attended the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University), and graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the College of Fine Arts in 1962.

Auberjonois was a member of the original faculty of Juilliard's Drama Division when it opened in 1968 under John Houseman.

Personal life -
Auberjonois was married to his wife Judith Mihalyi from 1963 until his death in 2019. They had two children, a daughter, and a son, Rèmy.

Illness and death -
In an interview with Compassion & Choices Magazine, Judith Auberjonois revealed that René underwent chemotherapy for lung cancer in 2018. It was discovered in 2019 that the cancer had spread to his brain. Due to the potential for serious cognitive side effects, Auberjonois chose not to pursue the whole-brain radiation treatment suggested by his doctors.

As a resident of California, Auberjonois decided to seek medical aid in dying under the California End of Life Option Act.  On December 6, 2019, he spent his final hours with his family at his home in Los Angeles reminiscing over photos and listening to music.  He then took the medication prescribed for assisted suicide and died two days later at the age of 79. The California End of Life Option Act stipulates that death certificates should list the underlying terminal illness as the cause of death, rather than the use of life-ending medications. His cause of death was given as metastatic lung cancer.

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Why did the Stargate franchise not have as lasting an effect on Science Fiction as Star Trek and Star Wars?

Well, Stargate did have quite similar effect on science fiction as Star Wars. In Star Wars everything just happens and that everything is treated as something very casual that does not need any explanation. Most of the science in Stargate is treated the same way; we have this alien technology that we don't have any idea about how it works, but we use it to kill aliens with. If Star Wars would be space opera, Stargate would be space western.

    You See In This World There's Two Kinds Of People, My Friend - Those With Loaded Guns, And Those Who Dig. You Dig.

Star Trek, on the other hand, have basically made the rules for modern science fiction. Everything that happens in Star Trek is somehow explained with science (even as nonsense as is often is) and most importantly Star Trek has this metadiscussion, internal dialogue, about right and wrong when it comes to using the technology - which the other franchises do not tend to do.

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I know the show leans more towards drama but the funniest episode has to be X-cops. I was literally laughing at least every 2 to 3 minutes especially when Scully keeps on shying away from the cameras. 

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Despite her good-hearted image on screen, cast members of "The Andy Griffith Show"  often remember Frances (Aunt Bee) Bavier as difficult, temperamental and somewhat cold. Griffith himself said, "There was just something about me she did not like." In an interview, when Ron (Opie) Howard was pressed as to the stories of discord with her on the set, all he would say was "I just don't think she enjoyed being around children that much." 
After 15 years of the weekly television-series grind she’d had it with the Business of Show, one of the reasons why Bavier moved — alone at age 70 — all the way across the continent to Siler City, NC where her biggest fan operated a family furniture store, hoping to discover the small-town goodness that she herself had come to represent in the minds of middle America. 
What began as an immersion into Americana quickly disintegrated into what can best be described as an episode of “The Twilight Zone.” On Saturday mornings, school buses pulled up in front of her split-level brick home on West Elk Street to unleash the Cub Scouts with instructions: “Go find your Aunt Bee!” There were neighbors peering through her windows at all hours of the day expecting her to be in character, a role she despised. The few townsfolk she grew close to insisted on calling her “Aunt Bee.” Irritating, but she had to have some friends. A visit to the town center meant all eyes casting judgment, the ladies at the beauty parlor never forgave her for not joining one of their churches. Small wonder that, by the 1980s, the former television star was living out of her back bedroom, curtains pulled tight, with 14 devoted kitties for company. 
In 1986, three years after she’d stopped venturing out in public, Griffith and Howard made a surprise visit to Siler City’s reclusive cat lady. Bavier refused to allow her decade-long coworkers inside, speaking to them only momentarily through the closed front door. This was after declining repeatedly to be part of their Mayberry reunion movie. 
When she died in 1989, Bavier funneled most of her $700,000 estate into an annuity that, to this day, pays out a yearly Christmas bonus to every Siler City police officer. But her true legacy began gestating not long after she was laid to rest at Oakwood Cemetery. When her home was donated to a local hospital, Bavier’s cats scampered for the countryside, causing one hell of a population explosion that is only now, decades later, beginning to subside. Ask any Chatham County, NC veterinarian. They were all too familiar with someone bringing in “one of Aunt Bee’s cats.” (IMDb/Billy Ingram, Triad City Beat; http://www.tvparty.com/andy.html "The story of why The Andy Griffith Show ended and how The New Andy Griffith Show flopped a year later."
Happy Birthday, Frances Bavier!

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47 years ago today, June 16, 1977, the final episode of The Fantastic Journey aired. It is an American science fiction television series that was originally aired on NBC from February 3 through June 16, 1977. It was originally intended to run 13 episodes, as a mid-season replacement, but NBC cancelled the series in April, after the ninth episode aired. A tenth episode, already produced, was burned off two months later.

D. C. Fontana recalled that once the show had been commissioned, she and the producers had a very short period of time to develop and produce the show before filming commenced. Additional scenes were filmed and inserted into the pilot which introduces the Atlanteans who are the focus of Episode 2, but this new material also quickly moves off-screen the characters Paul, Eve and Jill (who were originally intended to be regulars), as the network wanted a more diverse group of travelers. Also, a subplot involving the travelers finding a 1940s Air Force pilot held prisoner by 16th century pirates was removed from the first episode.

The show benefited from a larger than normal amount of location filming, with familiar sites such as the Hollywood Hills, Zuma Beach, the Bonaventure Hotel in LA and Griffith Park Observatory all appearing in various episodes. The character Willoway was created specifically with Roddy McDowall in mind. Fortunately the actor was interested and took the role when approached.

Although airing in a time when the nation's interest in the Bermuda Triangle, UFOs and fantasy was at a height, the show failed to last beyond the ten episodes, having been scheduled as a mid-season replacement (following the failure of another fantasy series, Gemini Man) against The Waltons and Welcome Back, Kotter, both very popular family shows. NBC ordered 12 episodes to follow the revised pilot, but production ended early when it was apparent that the ratings were low. The show was either pre-empted or its time-slot changed several times during its short run. By its tenth episode, its ratings had dropped, and it was cancelled. The script for an unproduced eleventh episode, "Romulus", was once available on the Internet. Within a few months of its abrupt ending, several of the production team would be producing the thematically similar Logan's Run for the Fall 1977 season.

The series concerns a family and their associates who charter a boat out into the Caribbean for a scientific expedition. After an encounter in the area of the Bermuda Triangle with an unnatural luminous green cloud accompanied by the eerie disembodied sound of ship's bells, the group find themselves shipwrecked on a mysterious uncharted island from which they are unable to escape.

Christina Hart as Gwenith, with Jared Martin as Varian, in "An Act of Love"
They encounter Varian (Jared Martin), initially disguised as an Arawak native, who is later revealed to be from the year 2230. A 23rd-century pacifist, musician and healer, Varian explains to the travelers that, like he and many before them, they have been caught in a space/time continuum where people from the past, present, future and from other worlds are trapped, co-existing on the island in a series of "Time Zones". The only way home can be found in a place called "Evoland", which lies "far to the rising sun". (It was indicated in interviews of the time that Evoland was also the name of the island.) The only way to travel between Time Zones is via invisible gateways that instantaneously transport individuals or groups from one zone to another. In one episode, "Beyond the Mountain", the group also encounters a second cloud, which has much the same effect, but which also splits up the group.

After the initial pilot story, a steady group of travelers forms around Varian as de facto leader, and the series then follows this group as they travel across the many Time Zones of the island to find Evoland. On their way, they encounter people from different planets and times who are also trapped on the island and who have adapted to their plight in different ways. The pilot initially suggested the historical past would be explored; however, the producers of the show rapidly adopted a consistently futuristic tone during the series following pressure from the network. They also dropped three characters after the pilot, as they wanted a more exotic group of travelers, hence the arrival of Liana and Willoway. Liana disappears from the last two episodes when Katie Saylor fell ill.

D. C. Fontana recalled that once the show had been commissioned, she and the producers had a very short period of time to develop and produce the show before filming commenced. Additional scenes were filmed and inserted into the pilot which introduces the Atlanteans who are the focus of Episode 2, but this new material also quickly moves off-screen the characters Paul, Eve and Jill (who were originally intended to be regulars), as the network wanted a more diverse group of travelers. Also, a subplot involving the travelers finding a 1940s Air Force pilot held prisoner by 16th century pirates was removed from the first episode.

The show benefited from a larger than normal amount of location filming, with familiar sites such as the Hollywood Hills, Zuma Beach, the Bonaventure Hotel in LA and Griffith Park Observatory all appearing in various episodes. The character Willoway was created specifically with Roddy McDowall in mind. Fortunately the actor was interested and took the role when approached.

Although airing in a time when the nation's interest in the Bermuda Triangle, UFOs and fantasy was at a height, the show failed to last beyond the ten episodes, having been scheduled as a mid-season replacement (following the failure of another fantasy series, Gemini Man) against The Waltons and Welcome Back, Kotter, both very popular family shows. NBC ordered 12 episodes to follow the revised pilot, but production ended early when it was apparent that the ratings were low. The show was either pre-empted or its time-slot changed several times during its short run. By its tenth episode, its ratings had dropped, and it was cancelled. The script for an unproduced eleventh episode, "Romulus", was once available on the Internet. Within a few months of its abrupt ending, several of the production team would be producing the thematically similar Logan's Run for the Fall 1977 season.

Varian (Jared Martin): "A man from the 23rd century possessing awesome powers", Varian generally uses a kind of crystalline "tuning fork" device called the Sonic Energizer through which he focuses his thoughts into what is described as a sonic manipulation of matter. The device is completely useless in anyone else's hands, and seems capable of a huge variety of tasks, from opening doors to disrupting electrical systems to large scale acts of destruction, as well as its apparently intended function as a diagnostic and healing device. Following the departure of Professor Paul Jordan at the end of the pilot film, Varian takes over as de facto leader to the travelers and adopts a parental role over Paul's teenage son, Scott (most notable in episodes such as "An Act of Love" and "Turnabout").
Scott Jordan (Ike Eisenmann): "The 13-year-old son of a famous scientist", Scott has an excellent knowledge of Earth history and events, but is still young and has much to learn.
Dr. Fred Walters (Carl Franklin): "A young doctor just out of medical school" whose impulsive and rather hot-headed nature acts as a counterpoint to the calm, pacifistic Varian. A friend of Scott's father and the only other member of the group from the same time period, the athletic black physician takes the role of protective "older brother" with the young teen.
Liana (Katie Saylor): "Daughter of an Atlantean father and an extraterrestrial mother", the beautiful blonde Liana possessed greater than human physical strength (due to her mother being from a planet with a higher gravity than Earth) and powerful psychic abilities (presumably due to her mixed heritage) which allow her to, among other things, telepathically communicate with animals. Saylor left the show after the episode "Turnabout" due to illness. In the next episode "Riddles" the reason for her not being present with the group was given that she opted to stay a few days at Coriel to help the inhabitants work out their new government and would catch up with the group later.
Dr. Jonathan Willoway (Roddy McDowall): "Rebel scientist from the 1960s" who has a mastery of computers, robotics and scientific knowledge which is quite useful to the group. He is something of a never entirely trustworthy black sheep, basically a cooler version of Doctor Smith from Lost in Space without the congenital cowardice, who often tends to do things for his own mysterious reasons. Over the course of the episodes, however, the black-clad Willoway comes to care about Scott and his fellow travelers and becomes more integrated into the group, although Fred makes no secret about still not trusting him which leads to a bickering Spock/McCoy-style relationship between the two.
Sil-El (The Felix Team): Liana's companion and pet, a "tuxedo cat" with which she can communicate telepathically and who sometimes scouts ahead for her, acting as an extra set of eyes and ears.

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Unlike his Professor character on "Gilligan's Island," Russell Johnson said he was not a bright student and was in fact held back a grade. Johnson did redeem himself later on in his school career and made the National Honor Society in high school. He joined the Army Air Corps in World War II, and earned the Purple Heart when his B-24 Liberator was shot down in the Philippines during a bombing run in March, 1945. After the war, he used the G.I. Bill to enroll in acting school to ply his new trade, and  starred in several Westerns and sci-fi classics as "This Island Earth" (1955) and "It Came from Outer Space" (1953).
"I was always the bad guy in Westerns. I played more bad guys than you can shake a stick at until I played the Professor. Then I couldn't get a job being a bad guy."
The Professor's backstory identifies him as Roy Hinkley (though his actual name is rarely mentioned during the series), a high-school science teacher who was born in Cleveland, Ohio. His principal expertise was as a botanist, whose purpose in joining the ill-fated voyage that stranded the castaways was to write a book to be titled "Fun With Ferns". His main function on the show was to devise many ways for the castaways to live more comfortably on the island. Many of his inventions (including a method for recharging the batteries in the ubiquitous radio) used coconuts and bamboo, both of which were in plentiful supply. Aside from his proficiency in science, he was also adept and well-versed in law, literature, social sciences, and the arts. Besides a list of degrees from various schools (including USC, UCLA, SMU, and TCU) he provides in one episode, little was ever learned about his past and nothing was ever learned about his family. In several episodes, brief remarks are made on his past: in the pilot he is described as a research scientist and "well-known scoutmaster"; in another when a big game hunter comes to the island and asks the Professor what sports he took, the answer is "chess"; after kissing Ginger for a prolonged period (during filming of a silent movie), he claims that he was able to hold his breath during the kissing because he used to be a "scuba diver"; in another, when the castaways try to recreate who killed Randolph Blake, the Professor threatens to "...cancel his subscription to the Science Quarterly." Also, in the episode "Will the Real Mr. Howell Please Stand Up?," the Professor states that he does "...hold a Masters Degree in Psychology." (IMDb/Wikipedia)
Happy Birthday, Russell Johnson!

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Leonard Nimoy sued Paramount — and won
Logical of course.  Right is Right 

Leonard Nimoy often saw Spock’s face on cereal cartons and posters and lunch boxes, and he never gave it much thought. That changed over dinner with Henry Fonda in 1975.
Fonda and Nimoy met in 1972 on the set of The Alpha Caper. Three years later, Nimoy and his wife Sandra Zober joined Fonda and his wife Shirlee Mae Adams for dinner in London after seeing Fonda perform in the play Darrow.
Fonda asked Nimoy what he thought of the Spock billboards all over the city. “What billboards, Henry?” Nimoy asked. Fonda replied, “Do you mean to tell me you don’t know about all those Heineken billboards?” Nimoy did not, but he now understood why a bartender had earlier suggested Nimoy might like to order a Heineken.

Nimoy found the Heineken poster’s sexual innuendo to be in bad taste. Once back home, he discovered the beer company had not been granted permission for the billboard campaign. 

Worse, he also found out Paramount had stopped paying him years earlier for the licencing of his image. So he sued Paramount for recompense. Paramount balked and the lawsuit dragged on, only to finally be resolved because Nimoy refused to even read the script for Star Trek: The Motion Picture until the studio settled.
A payment arrived and Nimoy signed on to play Spock.

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"Respectfully submitted for your perusal - a Kanamit. Height: a little over nine feet. Weight: in the neighborhood of three hundred and fifty pounds. Origin: unknown. Motives? Therein hangs the tale, for in just a moment, we're going to ask you to shake hands, figuratively, with a Christopher Columbus from another galaxy and another time. This is the Twilight Zone."

All of the 9-foot-tall Kanamits in the "Twilight Zone" episode "To Serve Man" (season 3, episode 24)are played by the same actor - 7'2" tall Richard Kiel (later to play the villainous henchman "Jaws" in the "James Bond" franchise). This is most apparent at the end, when two identical Kanamits stand near the spaceship in a split screen effect.

The arriving Kanamit ship is shown as scenes extracted from "The Day the Earth Stood Still" (1951), but with different sound; the departing Kanamit ship is shown as a scene extracted from "Earth vs. the Flying Saucers" (1956), also with different sound. (IMDb/Wikipedia)

Happy Birthday, Richard Kiel!

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